The Glossop VAH Project
 Glossop VAH Project
 Glossop VAH
George Street 69, 71 & 71A High Street West

George Street
The Oakwood
67 High Street West
Suedeheads / Help the Aged
69, 71 & 71A High Street West
Glossop Carpet Centre
52 High Street West
Restaurant 54
54 High Street West
Bargin Booze
56 High Street West
Summary
English Heritage Grade II Listed Building.
A Gothic Revival style public house and restaurant. c1870. Rock faced millstone grit with ashlar dressings and Welsh slate Mansard roof. First floor sill band with bracketed and moulded eaves. Stone stacks. Formerly the Surrey Arms P.H.

 1871 
Census
Number 67 was known as the Surrey Arms and was occupied by Sarah Boulton 37, an Inn Keeper, her sister Charlotte Boulton 29 and Domestic Servant Margaret Herbert 25.



 1881 
Census
Number 67 was known as the Surrey Arms and occupied by James Sykes 32, a Public House Manager, wife Annie Maria Sykes 27 and daughter Lilian Gertrude Lees Sykes 2. Also at this address were Alexander Sturgeon 31, a Bar Man and Sarah Jane McQuirk 21, a General Servant.



 1891 
Kelly’s Directory
Wildgoose John Lawrence, Surrey Arms hotel, 67 High street west



 1891 
Census
Number 69 & 67 were occupied by John Wildgoose 38, a Hotel Manager, wife Emma Wildgoose 39 and two barmaids Elizabeth Hopwood 27 and Minnie Turton 23.



 1899 
Kelly’s Directory
Hesketh Richard, Surrey Arms hotel, 67 High street west



 1901 
Census
The Surrey Arms Hotel occupied by Clifford Steventon 30, Licensed Victualler, his wife Margaret Steventon 21, children Walter S Steventon 4 and Edith Grace Steventon 9 months. Also at this address were Clara Mason 20, Mary Beattie 19, both Domestic Servants and Arthur Sparrow 23, a Barman.



 1903 
Derby & District Trades Directory
INNS
Surrey Arms, High street, west; good accommodation for commercial gentlemen, tourists, and visitors; ales and spirits of the best quality; good stabling. Clifford Steventor, proprietor



 1911 
Census
Number 67 was a property with 16 main rooms known as the Surrey Arms Hotel occupied by Clifford Steventon 40, Licensed Victualler, his wife Margaret Steventon 31, married 15 years with 5 children (1 died), Walter Steventon 13, Grace Steventon 10, Leslie Steventon 6, all at School and Sidney Steventon 2.



 1912 
Kelly’s Directory
Steventon Rt. Clifford, Surrey Arms hotel, 67 High st. we



 1925 
Kelly’sDirectory
Oldfield Harvey, Surrey Arms P.H. 67 High street west



 1932 
Kelly’s Directory
Grant Jsph. Surrey Arms P.H. 67 High st. west T N 191



 1935 


The turret of the Surrey Arms public house is clearly visible. Photograph courtesy of Mike Hallam.



 1941 
Kelly’s Directory
Surrey Arms P.H. (Jsph. Grant), 67 High street west. T N 191



 1956 
The Edinburgh Gazette, May 15, 1956
THE BANKRUPTCY ACTS, 1914 AND 1926
From The London Gazette
RECEIVING ORDERS
Norman Matthew Hill, residing in lodgings at 76 High Street East, Glossop, in the county of Derby, Chef, formerly residing and carrying on business at The Surrey Arms Hotel, High Street West, Glossop aforesaid, as hotel licensee and Joyce Sybil Hill, his wife, residing in lodgings at 76 High Street East, Glossop aforesaid, both formerly residing and carrying on business in co-partnership at The Children?s Shop, 68 Heysham Road, Morecambe, in the county of Lancaster, as children?s outfitters and drapers.



 1984 


The Surrey Arms a Robinson’s pub. Photograph courtesy of Glossop & District Historical Society.



 2000 


A patriotic Oakwood, probably taken during football’s Euro 2000. Photograph courtesy of Glossop & District Historical Society.



 2000 
English Heritage Grade II Listed Building
Public house and restaurant. c1870 with C20 alterations. Rock faced millstone grit with ashlar dressings and Welsh slate Mansard roof. First floor sill band with bracketed and moulded eaves. Stone stacks.
STYLE: Gothic Revival.
EXTERIOR: 2 storey and attic. High Street front has 4 windows. Ground floor has 4 pilasters with between blocked doorway to right and two large windows each with 2 round headed lights with columns and moulded arches. Above continuous fascia board. Above 2 pairs of pointed arch plain sash windows with columns between and hoodmoulds with carved stops. Above again 2 segment headed dormer windows with plain sashes and moulded surrounds. Corner has canted doorway with 2 panel door and overlight. Above narrow canted bay window with 3 narrow windows and above slate covered octagonal spire with lead cap. George Street front 9 windows arranged 2:2:1:2:2. Central projecting ashlar doorway has unusual pointed arch flanked by pilasters and brackets supporting gabled hood with carved shield. Above 2 polished marble roundels with ashlar brackets supporting moulded hood. Either side 2 pilasters with between 2 large windows each with 3 round headed lights with columns and moulded arches. Above continuous fascia board. Above central slightly projecting gable with large cross casement window in ashlar surround with pointed relieving arch above. Gable surmounted by ornate iron finial. Either side 2 pairs of pointed arch plain sashes with columns between and hoodmoulds with carved stops. Above either side 2 segment headed dormer windows with plain sashes and moulded surrounds.
INTERIOR: refitted late C20.
© English Heritage 2000.
The National Heritage List Text Entries contained in this material were obtained on 8/6/2013. The most publicly available up to date National Heritage List Text Entries can be obtained from www.english-heritage.org.uk.



 2004 


Photograph courtesy of Glossop & District Historical Society.



 2009 
Google Street View
Shows The Oakwood public house.



 2014 


Photo taken in 2014 by Glossop VAH.



 2014 
Memories of The Oakwood by Gemma Wildgoose.

Some know it as the old Surrey. Others know it as The (new) Oakwood. Some leave not even knowing their own name by the end of the night. But whoever you are, you’ll call it home before time’s, well, called too.

Decor-wise, think traditional pub meets Bohemia meets your living room. On the walls there’s also a decent turnover of art for sale by local people for local people. And thankfully, people further afield too (if you’re coming from Manchester, stay on the train an extra stop and you’ll find yourself in Hadfield, where ’The League of Gentlemen’ was filmed). Speaking of, it’s only a couple of quid by train, through some cracking countryside too. And less than five minutes walk from the station.

The food’s tasty and freshly made, and a house double is the same price as a branded single. When you’ve settled in for the night, who cares about famous names? Glossop, and The Oakwood, just isn’t that sort of place. The only thing that needs to be branded are the cows in the surrounding fields.

If it was a hand gesture, it would be a casual thumbs up. Friendly and chilled, you’ll find pew-booths in the front room, sofas and board games a-plenty in the back, and the ’Redroom’ upstairs playing host to comedy nights, gigs, poetry readings and general merriment. Books around the vast window sills even include a 1982 annual with the name of the landlord written in kid’s writing inside the cover - just one of the ways you know it’s a first-name-basis kind of establishment.

Last time I popped in for a bite to eat, I left nine hours later with a smile on my face and two games of Scrabble, a book about juggling and an anecdote about a French horn player under my belt. You can’t say fairer than that.